Using LinkedIn (As an Academic)

  • Log in daily.
  • Like, share or create something new daily.
  • Send connection requests.
  • Accept connection requests.
  • Title — Don’t let the default setting of your most recent job title be your LinkedIn title. Change it to something more relevant. It could be your topic of interest. It could be what you’re expert in. It could be that you teach or train as well as research. Think about people might search for someone like you. What terms would describe the role? If they fit as a tile, use it. And don’t forget to include your academic title in your name.
  • Pictures — A head shot of you doing your academic thing. So, lab researchers, you can be in your lab coat, holding a pipette, fiddling with blue, red, and green liquid (okay that last bit is not needed, but you get the drift). If you can, a banner image of you speaking or presenting. Or maybe even your latest article or book. Something that promotes you as a speaker or author.
  • Data/statistic about your field.
  • How to contact you (I know there’s a contact section, complete that as well as adding contact details in your summary).
  • What you have done — But focus on what you’d like to do more of. Leave out what you are not interested in doing.
  • Who you work with — Role titles are useful. They help people say “Ah, I’m one of those, this profile must be for me”.
  • Who you help — Especially if you work with one group of people (e.g., managers) but help another (e.g., their direct reports).
  • Your past clients or collaborators — Helps build social proof.
  • Quotes — What others have said about you or your work (obviously get their permission first). Also builds social proof.
  • Why you’re connecting.
  • What you’re interested in.
  • How they can meet with you.

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I’m a careers coach. I help people with PhDs or getting their PhDs answer the question — What next? This is a research strategy question as much as a jobs one.

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Dr. Richard Huysmans

Dr. Richard Huysmans

I’m a careers coach. I help people with PhDs or getting their PhDs answer the question — What next? This is a research strategy question as much as a jobs one.

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